P-6 BYLAW: QUÉBEC SUPERIOR COURT INVALIDATES THE PROVISION ON MASKS AND RECOGNIZES THE RIGHT FOR SPONTANEOUS PROTESTS TO NOT DISCLOSE AN ITINERARY (Press Release)

By: Julien Villeneuve, Standing Committee for the Support of Demonstrators (SCSD)
Originally published on: June 22 2016
Original French text here: https://www.facebook.com/Anarchopanda/posts/885912131520663

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Montreal, June 22 2016

P-6 BYLAW: QUÉBEC SUPERIOR COURT INVALIDATES THE PROVISION ON MASKS AND RECOGNIZES THE RIGHT FOR SPONTANEOUS PROTESTS TO NOT DISCLOSE AN ITINERARY

This ruling (see link) has landed four years after Anarchopanda pour la gratuité scolaire filed an application for unconstitutionality, following the Tremblay administration’s amendments to the P-6 bylaw at the height of the student protests of 2012, presumably the result of a political order by Jean Charest’s Liberal government.

The ruling confirms article 3.2 of the bylaw, which prevents face-covering by any participant in an assembly, gathering or march in the public space “without reasonable cause”, as being “excessive, unreasonable and arbitrary”. It has also been deemed unconstitutional according to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, as it infringes freedom of expression and of peaceful assembly.
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Students are calling for a “social strike” (Radio-Canada)

Originally published on March 13, 2015
See original French text here: http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/Politique/2015/03/13/001-associations-etudiants-greve-23-mars-asse.shtml

Strengthened by achieving their critical threshold 30,000 strikers, student associations, grouped mostly within the Association for Student Union Solidarity (ASSÉ), call for the whole of society to join their movement against fiscal austerity and exploitation of hydrocarbons.

Some 20 000 students representatives of the Université de Québec à Montréal, as well as representatives of the Université de Montréal and the Université Laval have invited the population – unions, community and women’s groups – to join the ranks of their demonstration on 21 March at Émilie-Gamelin Park.

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Minister Barrette wants to act quickly (Le Devoir)

By Jocelyne Richer – La Presse canadienne à Québec
Originally published on February 6, 2015
See original French text here: http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/sante/431148/projet-de-loi-10-le-ministre-barrette-veut-agir-rapidement

The anticipated adoption of the project of Bill 10 before the end of the day, thanks to a gag [literal translation, meaning to “invoke closure”, a parliamentary procedure limiting debate to force the passing of a law] decreed by the government, is only one of three steps seeking a major transformation in the health network in the coming months.

Before the parliamentary session even begins next Tuesday, MNAs had to present themselves in the chamber early Friday morning as part of the government’s decision to impose a term on the usual procedure to force the immediate adoption of Bill 10, which would abolish the health agencies and reduce the number of establishments in the network from 182 to 33.

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Barrette accused of manipulating the numbers (Le Devoir)

By Amélie Daoust-Boisvert
Originally published on January 15, 2015
See original French text here: http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/sante/429001/travail-des-medecins-barrette-accuse-de-manipuler-les-chiffres

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Photo: Michaël Monnier Le Devoir

Québec deliberately omitted to take into account work days that they considered as too short to arrive at the conclusion that family doctors do not work enough. This strategy has been judged as dishonest by the Fédération des médecins omnipraticiens du Québec (FMOQ) [federation representing general practitioners].

Minister Gaétan Barrette has been stating, since the end of November, that 60% of doctors work less than 175 days per year, for an average of 117 days. But Québec fused “small days” of work to account only for days that bill for at least $665 of services. This represents a threshold of about seven hours of work and allows doctors to be compared to, for example, teachers, asserts the press secretary of the minister, Joanne Beauvais.

The documents that Le Devoir obtained from the cabinet of the minister in January after a request made in mid-December show in this way that for all general practitioners, the “real” average for all family doctors is rather 196 days of work per year. If we take into account only the 80% best paid doctors, which eliminates doctors working part time, the average climbs up to 216.5 days.

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A Decisive Winter for the “Québec Model” (Le Devoir)

By Laura Pelletier
Originally published on: January 3, 2015
See original French version here: http://www.ledevoir.com/politique/quebec/428022/csq-un-hiver-determinant-pour-le-modele-quebecois

Photo: Michaël Monnier, Le Devoir, The CSQ denounces how little information has been transmitted by ministers regarding the coming reforms, among them those that will affect healthcare.

The Centrale des syndicats du Québec (CSQ) intends to continue putting pressure during the winter of 2015 in order to slow down the reforms and bill projects of the liberal government in their current forms. Reviving an expression that was associated with the years 1945-1960, the president of the CSQ, Louise Chabot, declared on Friday that Québec is under thread of being resubmerged in a “great darkness”.

Ms. Chabot warns that “the year risks becoming a theatre of important social confrontations if the government does not quickly pull itself together to re-establish a real dialogue with its population and its employees.” She admits to having a challenge of “information and mobilisation” for the next year.

The president denounces especially the governmental measures being proposed in the education, health and childcare sectors, as well as the reductions in financing for cegeps and universities, the abolition of regional health agencies and the modulation, according to family revenue, of fees for subsidized daycares.

These reforms “profoundly attack” the social model adopted in Québec since the Quiet Revolution, she reckons. “In Quebec we have equipped ourselves with a range of services in the name of the common good. If these reforms in education and healthcare are adopted, it will be step back by 10, 15, 20 years,” Ms. Chabot deplored. Continue reading