P-6 BYLAW: QUÉBEC SUPERIOR COURT INVALIDATES THE PROVISION ON MASKS AND RECOGNIZES THE RIGHT FOR SPONTANEOUS PROTESTS TO NOT DISCLOSE AN ITINERARY (Press Release)

By: Julien Villeneuve, Standing Committee for the Support of Demonstrators (SCSD)
Originally published on: June 22 2016
Original French text here: https://www.facebook.com/Anarchopanda/posts/885912131520663

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Montreal, June 22 2016

P-6 BYLAW: QUÉBEC SUPERIOR COURT INVALIDATES THE PROVISION ON MASKS AND RECOGNIZES THE RIGHT FOR SPONTANEOUS PROTESTS TO NOT DISCLOSE AN ITINERARY

This ruling (see link) has landed four years after Anarchopanda pour la gratuité scolaire filed an application for unconstitutionality, following the Tremblay administration’s amendments to the P-6 bylaw at the height of the student protests of 2012, presumably the result of a political order by Jean Charest’s Liberal government.

The ruling confirms article 3.2 of the bylaw, which prevents face-covering by any participant in an assembly, gathering or march in the public space “without reasonable cause”, as being “excessive, unreasonable and arbitrary”. It has also been deemed unconstitutional according to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, as it infringes freedom of expression and of peaceful assembly.
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Hostility and Confusion (Le Journal de Montréal)

By: Domonique Scali
Originally published on: April 10, 2015
Original French text here: http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/04/10/hostilite-et-confusion

QMI Photo Agency, JOËL LEMAY | Police officers and protesters exchanges “pleasantries” throughout the evening.

The protest last night in Montreal unfolded amidst confusion and hostility, as had been the case all week.

Several hundred students assembled last night in Saint-Louis Square where the festive atmosphere quickly turned to chaos.
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Protest’s Variable Standards (Le Devoir)

By: Marie-Andrée Chouinard
O
riginally published on: April 4, 2015
Original French text here: http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/actualites-en-societe/436429/profilage-politique-manifs-a-geometrie-variable

The way that cops treat students is different than the way they treat other advocacy groups

PHOTO CREDIT: Annik MH De Carufel Le Devoir | Hundreds of protesters, including many students, took to the streets in Montreal to oppose police brutality on March 15

Thursday April 2, Montreal. A motley crowd in the street, a street flooded by the spring sunlight that is finally warming our faces, faces coloured with the red of protest, a protest suddenly halted by shots of teargas and the charge of police officers.

Montreal, Sunday March 29. On this chilly day, women take to the streets and step out of Émilie-Gamelin square while shouting chants aimed at reminding Couillard’s government that no one is to hinder abortion access. Around 500 people make their way towards Health Minister Gaétan Barrette’s office then turn back around. The police flank the march but never intervene.

In both cases, no itinerary was provided to the police administration. No “violent” incidents were noted by the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM). And yet these two protests came to two very distinctive conclusions. Why?

“It’s quite obvious from the dozen recent protests: when they are not organized by student groups, but by feminist groups for example, they are not subject to the same treatment. The treatment is notably differential, and it amounts to political profiling.”
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Letter to my mother: why I am striking (Huffington Post)

By Gioia Cazzaniga
Originally published on March 26, 2015
See original French text here: http://quebec.huffingtonpost.ca/gioia-cazzaniga/lettre-a-ma-mere-pourquoi-je-fais-greve_b_6942712.html

My Dear Mother,

I know you are a bit far from here, from Montreal and the hot spot of the protest. You only have access to mainstream media, to [Education] Minister Blais who threatens students with cancelling the semester and right-wing commentators who are bent on pointing out spelling mistakes instead of listening to the message. Only if you would inform yourself a bit better, you would know we are more than 50 000 on strike, without counting the one-off strike mandates and the votes yet to come. Even medical students will take a day or two to denounce the measures of [Health] Minister Barette. Many unions also have their collective agreements ending next week and for them too, it smells strongly of protest.

It is not a question of illusions, it is not a question that only touches students. It is not like 2012. This time, it is a global political struggle.

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